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Speaker Bios


Harlyn Baker

Harlyn Baker
Consulting Scientist, Robotics Laboratory, Computer Science
Stanford University

Harlyn Baker is a Consulting Scientist in the Robotics Laboratory of Stanford's Computer Science Department. He has a PhD in Computer Science from Urbana-Champaign, M.Phil. in Machine Intelligence from Edinburgh University, and BSc from Western Ontario in Canada. He has held academic positions at Edinburgh, Stanford, Heidelberg, and UI Illinois Chicago, and corporate roles at SRI International, Interval Research, Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, and EPIImaging, LLC. His contributions have been in three-dimensional computer vision and automultiscopic 3D display, including the seminal multi-camera approach common to both termed Epipolar-Plane Image Analysis. As a member of the robotics team at Stanford he is contributing to bringing real-time 3D vision to automation tasks, including the lab's innovative haptic controlled deep-sea robotic explorer, Ocean One.

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Brian Bartholomeusz

Brian Bartholomeusz
Executive Director of Innovation Transfer
TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy,

Brian has held senior technology management positions in startups and established companies. He has focused on business and technology strategy, and managed the development and commercialization of new products for renewable energy and consumer electronics. He facilitated successful cross-border joint ventures, technology partnerships, and collaborative technology and product development programs. Brian has co-founded three startups and participated in a successful initial public stock offering. He has written more than 25 peer-reviewed publications, submitted fourteen granted and pending patents, and spoken at industry events.

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Sally Benson

Sally Benson
Precourt Family Professor, Professor of Energy Resources Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and at the Woods Institute for the Environment
Stanford University

Sally M. Benson, who joined Stanford University in 2007, is the Precourt Family Professor in the Department of Energy Resources Engineering in the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences; she studies technologies and pathways to reducing greenhouse gas emissions including geologic storage of CO2 in deep underground formations and energy systems analysis for a low-carbon future. She is the Co-Director of the Stanford Center for Carbon Storage and the Stanford Carbon Removal Initiative. She served at the Director and Co-Director of the Precourt Institute for Energy from 2013 to 2020. She also served as the Director of the Global Climate and Energy Project from 2009 to 2019.

Prior to joining Stanford, Benson was Division Director for Earth Sciences, Associate Laboratory Director for Energy Sciences and Deputy Director at LBNL.

Professor Benson currently serves on the Board of Directors for Climate Central and from 2008 to 2020 on the Board of Directors of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Currently she also serves on the Advisory Boards for Breakthrough Energy Ventures, Argonne National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Princeton's Carbon Mitigation Initiative, Princeton's Adlinger Center, Japan's Initiative for the Cool Earth Forum, Climate Vault, and the Lahore University of Management Science in Pakistan. Over the past several years she participated in a number of National Academy of Sciences, Secretary of Energy, and National Petroleum Council research needs assessments related to carbon management. She also is on the Editorial Board for Energy and Environmental Sciences.

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Nazeer Bhore

Nazeer Bhore
Manager, Lead Generation and Breakthrough Research
ExxonMobil Research and Engineering

Nazeer Bhore is the Manager of Lead Generation and Breakthrough Research at Exxon Mobil Research and Engineering in Clinton , New Jersey . He has more than 25 years' experience at ExxonMobil and its affiliates in various refining, chemical , marketing and corporate functions such as research, development innovation, engineering, planning, technical services, and technology licensing.

Nazeer holds a B.E. from University of Bombay and a Ph .D. from University of Delaware, both in Chemical Engineering. He is a lso a graduate of the Wharton M anagement Program.

In his current role, Nazeer is responsible for Breakthrough Research for Downstream Business and the Innovation Health of EMRE's R&D Organization.

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Madhur Boloor

Madhur Boloor
GCEP Distinguished Student Lecturer
Stanford University

Madhur is a 5th year Ph.D. Candidate in Materials Science and Engineering working with Professor William Chueh, and his research focuses on solar water splitting for sustainable hydrogen generation. Madhur is interested in improving pathways for commercialization of energy research, and is hoping to pursue a career at the interface of energy technology and policy.

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Matteo Cargnello

Matteo Cargnello
Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering
Stanford University

Matteo Cargnello is Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering and Terman Faculty Fellow. His group research interests are in the preparation and use of uniform and tailored materials for heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis and the technological exploitation of nanoparticles and nanocrystals. Reactions of interest are related to sustainable energy generation and use, control of emissions of greenhouse gases, and better utilization of abundant building blocks (methane, biomass). Dr. Cargnello received his Ph.D. in Nanotechnology in 2012 at the University of Trieste (Italy) and he was then a post-doctoral scholar in the Chemistry Department at the University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia) before joining the Faculty at Stanford. He is the recipient of the ENI Award Debut in Research 2013 and the European Federation of Catalysis Societies Award as best European Ph.D. thesis in catalysis in 2013.

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Lynette Cegelski

Lynette Cegelski
Associate Professor of Chemistry and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering
Stanford University

Associate Professor Lynette Cegelski's research is inspired by the challenge and importance of elucidating chemical structure and function in biological systems and the need for new and unconventional strategies to treat infectious diseases. Cegelski completed her undergraduate studies in Chemistry at SUNY-Binghamton, New York (B.S. summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa 1998), where she participated in research to determine the microtubule-bound conformation of the anti-cancer drug Taxol by REDOR solid-state NMR. This formative experience motivated her move to Washington University to conduct her PhD training in the laboratory of Professor Jacob Schaefer (Ph.D. Chemistry 2004). She investigated bacterial and plant macromolecular and whole-cell systems using solid-state NMR, including examining the mode of action of the antibiotic oritavancin and investigating photosynthesis and photorespiration in soybean leaves with 13CO2 and 15N labeling. She introduced the use of 4-frequency TEDOR-REDOR measurements in whole cells for the first time. She trained in Microbiology and Infectious Disease research as a postdoctoral fellow in Molecular Microbiology at the Washington University School of Medicine, working with Professor Scott Hultgren. There, she defined amyloid contributions to E. coli biofilms and introduced the first small-molecule inhibitors of functional amyloid assembly in bacteria. She joined the faculty of the Stanford Chemistry Department in 2008. The Cegelski Research program integrates chemistry, biology, and physics to investigate the assembly and function of macromolecular and whole-cell systems. They are revealing new bacterial structures, uncovering fundamental parameters of chemical composition and architecture in complex biofilm assemblies, and identifying new anti-infectives and anti-infective strategies. Cegelski's work has garnered early career awards, including the Burroughs Wellcome Career Award at the Scientific Interface, the 2010 NIH Director's New Innovator Award, the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE).

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William Chueh

William Chueh
Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy
Stanford University

The availability of low-cost but intermittent renewable electricity (e.g., derived from solar and wind) underscores the grand challenge to store and dispatch energy so that it is available when and where it is needed. Redox-active materials promise the efficient transformation between electrical, chemical, and thermal energy, and are at the heart of carbon-neutral energy cycles. Understanding design rules that govern materials chemistry and architecture holds the key towards rationally optimizing technologies such as batteries, fuel cells, electrolyzers, and novel thermodynamic cycles. Electrochemical and chemical reactions involved in these technologies span diverse length and time scales, ranging from Ångströms to meters and from picoseconds to years. As such, establishing a unified, predictive framework has been a major challenge. The central question unifying our research is: “can we understand and engineer redox reactions at the levels of electrons, ions, molecules, particles and devices using a bottom-up approach?” Our approach integrates novel synthesis, fabrication, characterization, modeling and analytics to understand molecular pathways and interfacial structure, and to bridge fundamentals to energy storage and conversion technologies by establishing new design rules.

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Iain Cooper

Iain Cooper
Manager
Schlumberger Corporate Ventures

Iain Cooper co-created Schlumberger's Corporate Venture Capital Group in 2008, a group that has made over 20 investments across the globe. Their most recent exit, the ocean-powered drone company Liquid Robotics, was acquired by Boeing.

Previously in Schlumberger, he has managed Drilling and Completions Research, and Global Product Development for the stimulation, cementing, and coiled tubing business units.

Iain has degrees in Mathematics and Physics and a PhD in Meteorology. He is a Chartered Physicist and Chartered Scientist, and Fellow of both the Institute of Physics and the Royal Meteorological Society. He also holds 26 granted US patents in a range of oilfield technologies, and co-authored and edited the best-selling SPE textbook "Advanced Drilling & Well Technology".

Based in Houston, Iain is also a board director at GHGSat, Sarcos, BiSN, Molyworks, and CelluForce.

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Yi Cui

Yi Cui
Materials Science and Engineering
Stanford University

Yi Cui is a professor of materials science and engineering at Stanford, and of photon science at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. His research focuses on nanomaterials for energy storage, solar cells, topological insulators, biology and the environment. Cui is an associate editor of Nano Letters, co-director of the Department of Energy’s Bay Area Photovoltaics Consortium and Battery 500 consortium, and co-founder of Amprius Inc. and 4C Air Inc. He is a fellow of the Materials Research Society and the Royal Society of Chemistry. His honors include a Kavli Distinguished Lectureship in Nanoscience, and the David Filo and Jerry Yang Faculty Scholar at Stanford. He received a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Science and Technology of China, and a Ph.D. in chemistry from Harvard University. His GCEP efforts include “Toward High-Efficiency Thin Film Solar Cells Combining Multi-Junctions and Nano-Scale Light” and “Self-Healing Polymers for High-Energy-Density Lithium Ion Battery.”

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Persis Drell

Persis Drell
Provost, James and Anna Marie Spilker Professor and Professor in the School of Engineering, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Professor of Physics
Stanford University

Drell is a physicist who has served on the Stanford faculty since 2002. She is the James and Anna Marie Spilker Professor in the School of Engineering, a professor of materials science and engineering, and a professor of physics. She is the former dean of the Stanford School of Engineering and the former director of the U.S. Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory at Stanford.

Drell received her bachelor's degree in mathematics and physics from Wellesley College in 1977, followed by a PhD in atomic physics from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1983. She then switched to high-energy experimental physics and worked as a postdoctoral scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. She joined the physics faculty at Cornell University in 1988.

In 2002, Drell joined the Stanford faculty as a professor and director of research at SLAC. In her early years at SLAC, she worked on the construction of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In 2005, she became SLAC's deputy director and was named director two years later. She led the 1,600-employee SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory until 2012. Drell is credited with helping broaden the focus of the laboratory, increasing collaborations between SLAC and the main Stanford campus, and overseeing transformational projects.

During Drell's tenure as director, SLAC transitioned from being a laboratory dedicated primarily to research in high-energy physics to one that is now seen as a leader in a number of scientific disciplines. In 2010, the laboratory began operations of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). LCLS is the world's most powerful X-ray free electron laser, which is revolutionizing study of the atomic and molecular world. LCLS is used to conduct scientific research and drive applications in energy and environmental sciences, drug development, and materials engineering.

After serving as the director of SLAC, Drell returned to the Stanford faculty, focusing her research on technology development for free electron lasers and particle astrophysics. Drell was named the dean of the Stanford School of Engineering in 2014.

As dean of the School of Engineering, Drell catalyzed a collaborative school-wide process, known as the SoE-Future process, to explore the realms of possibility for the future of the School of Engineering and engineering education and research. The process engaged a broad group of stakeholders to ask in what areas the School of Engineering could make significant world-changing impact, and how the school should be configured to address the major opportunities and challenges of the future.

The process resulted in a set of 10 broad aspirational questions to inspire thought on the school's potential impact in the next 20 years. The process also resulted in a series of actionable recommendations across three areas - research, education, and culture. Drell's approach to leading change emphasized the importance of creating conditions to optimize the probability of success.

As dean, Drell placed an emphasis on diversity and inclusion. She focused on increasing the participation of women and underrepresented minorities in engineering. She also sought to ensure a welcoming and inclusive environment for students of all backgrounds in the school.

In addition to her administrative responsibilities, Drell teaches a winter-quarter companion course to introductory physics each year for undergraduate students who had limited exposure to the subject in high school.

Drell is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a fellow of the American Physical Society. She has been the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and a National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award.

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Christopher Edwards

Christopher Edwards
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy
Stanford University

The Edwards research group is focused on fundamental research for advanced energy technologies. The group performs theoretical and experimental studies of energy transformations such that the conversion process can be made cleaner, more efficient, and more controllable than has been possible with traditional technologies. Applications include advanced transportation engines (piston and turbine) and advanced electric power generation with carbon mitigation.

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Shanhui Fan

Shanhui Fan
Joseph and Hon Mai Goodman Professor of the School of Engineering and, Professor, by courtesy, of Applied Physics
Stanford University

Fan's research involves the theory and simulations of photonic and solid-state materials and devices; photonic crystals; nano-scale photonic devices and plasmonics; quantum optics; computational electromagnetics; parallel scientific computing.

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Steven Freilich

Steven Freilich
DuPont, Director of Corporate Strategy - University of Delaware Energy Institute

Steven C. Freilich is currently the Director of Corporate Strategy for the University of Delaware Energy Institute, having recently retired from DuPont after a 33-year career. For the last 12 years of his DuPont career, he served as the Director of Materials Science in DuPont Central Research and Development. In that role, Dr. Freilich was responsible for developing and implementing the technology growth strategies in rapidly moving areas such as materials for energy. He used his experience to impact corporate growth through his knowledge of the interaction of technology with markets in aiding innovation.

While serving as Director of Materials Science, Dr. Freilich held the additional position of CTO of the DuPont Electronics and Communication Platform, and was appointed as the Chief Technology Advocate for North Asia. He served on the boards of the United States Display Consortium, DuPont Photonics Technologies, and was the Vice Chair of the Advisory Panel for the Center for Revolutionary Solar Photoconversion. He has also served on the advisory boards for Sandia National Laboratory, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the National Research Council of Canada. He currently is Vice Chair of the Advisory Committee for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center at NREL.

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Emmett Goodman

Emmett Goodman
GCEP Distinguished Student Lecturer
Stanford University

Emmett is a 2nd year PhD student working with Prof. Matteo Cargnello in Chemical Engineering, and received his undergraduate degree in Chemical Engineering from Caltech. His interests revolve around using precise catalytic materials to uncover structure-property relationships, and using this knowledge to develop more active, selective, and stable materials.

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Olivia Hendricks

Olivia Hendricks
GCEP Distinguished Student Lecturer
Stanford University

Olivia is a 5th year PhD student in Chemistry working jointly for Professors Chris Chidsey and Paul McIntyre. Her research focuses on atomic layer deposition of transition metal oxide alloys with applications in solar energy storage. She received my B.A. in Chemistry from Wellesley College in 2012.

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Matthew Kanan

Matthew Kanan
Chemistry
Stanford University

Matthew Kanan is an assistant professor of chemistry at Stanford University. His research focuses on challenges in heterogeneous and molecular catalysis with an emphasis on developing scalable CO2 utilization technologies. His group has invented “grain-boundary-rich” heterogeneous electrocatalysts for CO2 reduction to liquid fuels and carbonate-promoted C–H carboxylation reactions for commodity carboxylic acid synthesis. Kanan was named one of the Talented 12 by Chemistry and Engineering News (2015) and a Dreyfus Environmental Postdoctoral Mentor (2012). He is also recipient of the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award (2014). Kanan studied chemistry as an undergraduate at Rice University and received a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Harvard University.

Andy Karsner

Andy Karsner
Managing Partner
Emerson Collective

Andy Karsner is Managing Partner of Emerson Collective, Senior Strategist and Space Cowboy at X; and Precourt Energy Scholar at Stanford University. He champions the values of Emerson Collective to prioritize the needs of humanity in concert with nature.

His entrepreneurial leadership has been associated with both venture capital and private equity portfolios responsible for guidance and/or holdings in some of the most successful technology startups over the last ten years, including Nest (Internet of things), Tesla (mobility), Recurrent (solar), and Codexis (biotech). From 2005 to 2008, Karsner served as Assistant Secretary of Energy for Efficiency and Renewable Energy of the United States, managing the approximately $2 billion annual federal applied science, research and development portfolio. In this role he helped assemble significant bipartisan coalitions to implement or enact the Energy Policy Act, the Energy Independence and Security Act and the America Competes Act, all of which remain the foundation of comprehensive energy policy today. In diplomacy, Karsner was a principal climate negotiator of the "Bali Roadmap" and an original architect of the Major Economies Process.

Prior to public service, Karsner held several global leadership positions, including founder and CEO of Enercorp, a windpower development firm and international agent of Vestas, involved in project development, management and financing of energy infrastructure; director and senior development manager for Wartsila Power Development and other multinational energy and development firms. Karsner sits on several prominent boards including Applied Materials (Nasdaq: AMAT), Conservation International, The Gas Technology Institute, and the advisory board of MIT Medialab.

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Clarence Lehman

Clarence Lehman
Professor, Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, Special Advisor to the Dean, College of Biological Sciences
University of Minnesota

Clarence Lehman's early life was in the computer industry, designing computer software and hardware. He obtained a doctoral degree in ecology from the University of Minnesota in 2000. Computer science and biology have proved to be a useful symbiotic combination for research pursuits including theoretical ecology and computation in biology, carbon-negative bioenergy and the ecology of the Anthropocene, long-term database storage, automated methods for education, and connections among science, ethics, and society. A guiding principle is to learn to manage our role in the earth's combined physical-biological-social dynamics for long-term habitability, both by humans and our fellow creatures.

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Gary Leonard

Gary Leonard
General Manager, Distributed Power Gas Turbines (retired in Feb 2016) - GE, Principal Consultant - Falconhead Consulting

Gary currently provides advice to investment funds and venture capitalists to assist in their efforts to assess technology related investment opportunities. Prior to his role as an advisor, Gary spent 34 years with GE in various Power, Aviation and Corporate Research leadership roles.

Most recently Gary led GE's Distributed Power Gas Turbine Business, a $3B/yr product business providing the world's best 20 to 120MW packaged gas turbines for the power generation and oil & gas industries. The scope of this role entailed everything from product development through installation and commissioning of new power plants.

During Gary's tenure with Stanford University's GCEP program, he led a team of 400 engineers focused on developing GE's next generation of aircraft engines, gas turbines, diesel engines, wind turbines, and solar/geothermal thermal products. In addition, his team developed and used advanced tools in the CFD, Heat Transfer, Combustion, Mechanics and Data Analytics areas.

Gary received his MS and PhD, both in Mechanical Engineering, from Stanford University. He and his family currently live in Austin, Texas.

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Xu Li

Xu Li
Associate Professor at the Plants for Human Health Institute
North Carolina State University

Xu Li is an Associate Professor at the Plants for Human Health Institute, North Carolina State University (NCSU). Before joining NCSU in 2011, he worked as a postdoctoral research associate in Clint Chapple's laboratory in the Department of Biochemistry at Purdue University. He received his PhD degree in biochemistry in 2005 from Iowa State University where he was awarded a Plant Science Institute Fellowship in 2000. He obtained a B.S. degree in plant molecular and developmental biology, and a M.S. degree in plant physiology, both from Peking University in China.

Li's research focuses on plant specialized metabolism. He is interested in integrating metabolomics, genetics, and genomics approaches to discover and characterize functions of biosynthetic genes in plant metabolic pathways. In a GCEP-funded project, his lab has been studying the mechanism underlying the growth inhibition observed in lignin-deficient plants, which is of great significance in the context of maximizing the yield of biomass that is optimized for biofuel production.

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Aaron Lindenberg

Aaron Lindenberg
Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and of Photon Science
Stanford University

Lindenberg's research is focused on visualizing the ultrafast dynamics and atomic-scale structure of materials on femtosecond and picosecond time-scales. X-ray and electron scattering and spectroscopic techniques are combined with ultrafast optical techniques to provide a new way of taking snapshots of materials in motion. Current research is focused on the dynamics of phase transitions, ultrafast properties of nanoscale materials, and charge transport, with a focus on materials for information storage technologies, energy-related materials, and nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

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Stuart Macmillan

Stuart Macmillan
Precourt Energy Scholar and Adjunct Professor
Stanford University

Macmillan is a Precourt Energy Scholar and Adjunct Professor at Stanford University. Prior to his current role, he was a Chief Scientist at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Consulting Professor at Stanford University, an advisor to founders of energy-related startups and on the founding teams of numerous technology ventures. He has been co-teaching the Energy Transformation Collaborative classes for the past several years. Currently Stuart is focused on new technologies, business models and innovation models that can accelerate the transformation of global energy systems and the services they enable. He holds an M.S. and Ph.D. from Stanford University.

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James E. Mahoney

James E. Mahoney
Corporate Public Policy Executive
Bank of America

James E. Mahoney is the Strategy and Public Policy executive for Bank of America responsible for enhancing Bank of America's reputation through influencer communications, federal and state government relations, and issues management.

Mahoney leads international, national and local public policy engagement and issues management for Bank of America and its operations around the world. He oversees the development and execution of strategic communications that help drive the company's reputation. Mahoney's team also helps shape and deliver Bank of America's current 10-year, $125 billion environmental business initiative to help support clean energy and reduce demands on natural resources through lower-carbon lending, investment and financing solutions.

In 2015 Mahoney was named to PRWeek's "The Power 50" - people who are "redefining the role of comms and marketing and elevating their brands and agencies to the highest levels on a global scale." Ranked No. 19 overall, Mahoney was the top financial services executive on the list.

Mahoney previously was Director of Corporate Communications and Public Policy for FleetBoston Financial, overseeing government relations, media relations and internal communications. Before that, he was the Secretary of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and District Director for Congressman Joseph P. Kennedy II.

Mahoney is a board member of the National Urban League and serves on the Board of Directors of the New England Council. He also is a member of the management committee for Stanford University's Global Climate & Energy Project. Mahoney serves on the board of the U. S. Chamber of Commerce Center for Capital Markets and was a Trustee of the University of Massachusetts from 1999 to 2005.

Mahoney has a Bachelor of Arts degree from Colby College and a Master of Science degree from Harvard University.

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Arun Majumdar

Arun Majumdar
Mechanical Engineering
Precourt Institute for Energy
Stanford University

Arun Majumdar is the Jay Precourt Professor at Stanford University, where he is a member of the Department of Mechanical Engineering faculty and co-director of the Precourt Institute for Energy.  His research focuses on using electrochemical reactions for thermal energy conversion, thermochemical water-splitting reactions to produce carbon-free hydrogen, understanding the limits of heat transport in nanostructured materials, and a new initiative to re-engineer the electricity grid. In 2009, President Obama nominated him as the first director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency–Energy in the Department of Energy (DOE), where he served until 2012. He was also the acting under secretary of energy and a senior advisor to Energy Secretary Steven Chu. After leaving the DOE and before joining Stanford, Majumdar was the vice president for energy at Google. Prior to joining the DOE, he was on the faculty at University of California–Berkeley and was associate laboratory director for energy and environment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Majumdar serves on the U.S. Secretary of Energy’s advisory board, and the science boards of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He is a member of the international advisory panel for energy of the Singapore Ministry of Trade & Industry, and the U.S. delegation for the U.S.–India Track II dialogue on climate change and energy. In 2014, the U.S. State Department appointed him as a science envoy with an emphasis on energy and innovation in Poland and the Baltics. Majumdar is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He received a BTech in mechanical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology–Bombay, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from UC-Berkeley.

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Paul Mcintyre

Paul Mcintyre
Rick and Melinda Reed Professor, Professor of Photon Science and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy
Stanford University

McIntyre's group performs research on nanostructured inorganic materials for applications in electronics, energy technologies and sensors. He is best known for his work on metal oxide/semiconductor interfaces, ultrathin dielectrics, defects in complex metal oxide thin films, and nanostructured Si-Ge single crystals. His research team synthesizes materials, characterizes their structures and compositions with a variety of advanced microscopies and spectroscopies, studies the passivation of their interfaces, and measures functional properties of devices.

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Anders R. Nilsson

Anders R. Nilsson
Professor of Photon Science
Stanford University

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Nancy Pfund

Jens Nørskov
Leland T. Edwards Professor in the School of Engineering
Stanford University

Jens Nørskov is a professor of Chemical Engineering and Photon Science and Director of the SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis at Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Jens Nørskov's research aims at developing theoretical methods and concepts to understand and predict properties of materials. He is particularly interested in surface chemical properties, heterogeneous catalysis, electro-catalysis, and applications in energy conversion.

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Lynn Orr

Lynn Orr
Former Under Secretary for Science and Energy - U.S. Department of Energy, Founding Director of GCEP and Precourt Institute for Energy
Stanford University

Dr. Franklin (Lynn) M. Orr served as the Under Secretary for Science and Energy from December 17, 2014 to January 20, 2017. As the Under Secretary, Dr. Orr was the principal advisor to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary on clean energy technologies and science and energy research initiatives. Dr. Orr was the inaugural Under Secretary for the office, which was created by Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz to closely integrate DOE's basic science, applied research, technology development, and deployment efforts. As Under Secretary, he oversaw DOE's offices of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Fossil Energy, Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Nuclear Energy, and Science. In total, these programs steward thirteen of DOE's seventeen National Laboratories.

Prior to joining the Department of Energy, Dr. Orr was the Keleen and Carlton Beal

Professor in Petroleum Engineering in the Department of Energy Resources Engineering at Stanford University. He joined Stanford in 1985. He served as the founding director of the Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford University from 2009 to 2013. He was the founding director of the Stanford Global Climate and Energy Project from 2002 to 2008, and he served as Dean of the School of Earth Sciences at Stanford from 1994 to 2002. He was head of the miscible flooding section at the New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology from 1978 to 1985, a research engineer at the Shell Development Company Bellaire Research Center from 1976 to 1978, and assistant to the director, Office of Federal Activities, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from 1970 to 1972. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota and a B.S. from Stanford University, both in Chemical Engineering.

Dr. Orr is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He served as a member of the Board of Directors of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute from 1987 to 2014, and was a member of the Board of Trustees of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation from 1999 to 2008, for which he has also chaired the Science Advisory Panel for the Packard Fellowships in Science and Engineering from 1988 to 2014. He served as a member of the 2008/09 National Research Council Committee on America's Energy Future.

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Balaji Prabhakar

Balaji Prabhakar
VMware Founders Professor of Computer Science, Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Operations, Information and Technology at the Graduate School of Business
Stanford University

Prabhakar's research focuses on the design, analysis, and implementation of data networks: both wireline and wireless. He has been interested in designing network algorithms, problems in ad hoc wireless networks, and designing incentive mechanisms. He has a long-standing interest in stochastic network theory, information theory, algorithms, and probability theory.

Richard Sassoon

Richard Sassoon
Global Climate and Energy Project
Stanford University

Richard Sassoon is the managing director of the Global Climate and Energy Project where he coordinates and oversees all day-to-day operations and provides strategic direction to the Project. Prior to joining GCEP, Sassoon was senior scientist and assistant vice president at Science Applications International Corporation, where he worked with the U.S. Department of Energy in strategic planning and management of its environmental research programs. His research interests are in the area of photochemical solar energy conversion and storage systems. Sassoon received his B.Sc. in Chemistry from Leeds University, and his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel.

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Austin Sendek

Austin Sendek
GCEP Distinguished Student Lecturer
Stanford University

Austin Sendek is a fifth-year Ph.D. student in the Department of Applied Physics working primarily with Professor Evan Reed. Sendek's research focuses on leveraging machine learning to accelerate the discovery and design process for materials for solid-state lithium ion batteries. More generally, Sendek is interested in making the innovation process in energy and environmental technologies smarter, leaner, and faster. Sendek has served as the Vice President and Co-President of the Stanford Energy Club, and was a member of the 2016 cohort of the Woods Institute's Rising Environmental Leaders Program. He holds a B.S. in Applied Physics from the University of California, Davis.

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Alfred Spormann

Alfred Spormann
Chemical Engineering
Stanford University

Alfred Spormann is a professor of chemical engineering and of civil & environmental engineering at Stanford University. He directs a research group focused on developing fundamental understandings of microbial electron-transferring processes in natural and engineered environments. His recent GCEP projects include a study of microbial electrosynthesis for the carbon-neutral production of useful chemicals and biofuels. Spormann is an elected fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology and recipient of a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation. He received a doctorate in natural sciences from Philipps University in Germany.

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James Swartz

James Swartz
James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering
Stanford University

Professor Swartz received his first lessons in resourcefulness and persistence growing up on a farm in South Dakota. After earning a BS in Chemical Engineering with Highest Honors from S. Dak. School of Mines and Technology, he began his professional career with Union Oil Co. of CA in Casper, Wyoming. Serving in the Drilling, Reservoir Engineering, and Production Departments provided an appreciation of the complexity and importance of large scale energy technologies. That experience also strengthened his belief that biological technologies offered the power and versatility to better address evolving societal needs. The MIT graduate programs in chemical engineering (MS) and biochemical engineering (Dsc) helped strengthen his biological training while broadening an appreciation for this emerging field. Following a 3 month exchange visit to the Soviet Union, he gained additional experience at Eli Lilly and participated in the development of the first recombinant DNA pharmaceutical to be approved, rDNA insulin. After two years, he moved to Genentech to help establish their drug production capability, developing the fermentation process for their first product, rDNA growth hormone.

After 17 years at Genentech in various line and project leadership positions, he joined the Stanford Chemical Engineering Department with a focus on an embryonic technology called cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS). Multiple technology breakthroughs from his lab motivated the founding of Sutro Biopharma which now has four promising anti-cancer drugs in clinical trials. A new company called Vaxcyte later spun out of Sutro to focus on complex human vaccines enabled by CFPS. Both companies are now publicly traded. Another company, GreenLight Biosciences, is focusing on inexpensive, large scale RNA production for use against agricultural pests. At Stanford, Professor Swartz is now focusing on expanding the basic capabilities of cell-free bioprocess while also developing technologies for targeted drug development, vaccines, circulating tumor cell assays, the carbon negative production of commodity biochemicals, and for economically attractive photosynthetic hydrogen production.

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Eric Toone

Eric Toone
Executive Managing Director for Technology
Breakthrough Energy Ventures

Dr. Eric Toone received his doctoral degree in Chemistry from the University of Toronto in 1988 and completed post-doctoral studies with Professor George Whitesides at Harvard University. He began his independent career at Duke in 1990, and is currently Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Biochemistry. Professor Toone has authored over 220 original papers, reviews, book chapters and abstracts in physical organic and biophysical chemistry. He is also listed as an inventor on more than 20 patents in a range of biomedical fields and is a scientific founder of three research-based pharmaceutical companies, Aerie Pharmaceuticals, a publically-traded ophthalmology (glaucoma) company, Vindica Pharmaceuticals, focused on the therapeutic administration of nitric oxide, and Valanbio Therapeutics, developing novel antibiotics for Gram-negative organisms. From 2009 to 2012 Professor Toone was detailed to the US Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E). During that time, he served both as Program Director and Deputy Director for Technology before leading the Agency in 2012. Professor Toone returned to Duke in 2013 and served as Vice Provost and Director of the Duke University Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative, an initiative designed to foster entrepreneurship across the entire university community, until May 2017. Dr. Toone is currently the Executive Managing Director for Technology at Breakthrough Energy Ventures, $1 billion investment fund of the Breakthrough Energy Coalition, a group of the world's most influential leaders assembled by Bill Gates to advance clean energy technologies.

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Joan Wills

Joan Wills
Power Systems Technical Executive Director - Cummins, Ambassador - Clean Energy Education & Empowerment (C3E)

Joan Wills is the Cummins Power Systems Technical Executive Director leading development and support of power systems and reciprocating engine systems including both diesel and natural gas fuel options. These products are used in distributed power generation, commercial marine, oil and gas, mining and rail markets globally. Wills is also responsible for technical site leadership for UK and Charleston, US-based power systems technical centers. Starting from 2014, she was Chief Engineer and Program Leader developing Cummins high-horsepower engines to meet North America Tier4 emission regulations. Prior to that, Wills led technology strategy and planning for Cummins and worked with global technical and business leaders to set long-term technical investment direction linked to market and product roadmaps. Her early career experience is in developing control and diagnostic systems for diesel and natural gas engines. She has a career track record of putting together diverse, relevant experts to solve complex energy and engine-related issues plus a passion for clean energy and energy access issues. She holds 19 US patents for her work in diesel engine controls and diagnostics. She currently serves as invited Ambassador for the US Department of Energy C3E (Women in Clean Energy) initiative and is a member of the World Economic Forum Global Futures Council on Energy along with being an active member of SWE, IEEE and SAE. She holds an MSEE from The Ohio State Center for Automotive Research, a Strategy & Innovation certificate from MIT Sloan and a BSEE from the University of Dayton Ohio.

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Robert Wimmer

Robert Wimmer
Director of Energy & Environmental Research, Product Regulatory Affairs
Toyota Motor North America

Mr. Wimmer directs Toyota Motor North America's (TMNA) Energy and Environmental Research Group. He has been with Toyota since 2003 and currently leads a team of research engineers and scientists assessing how changes in energy and environmental technology, policy and regulation will affect the automotive industry. Research areas include petroleum and alternative fuels, advanced vehicle technologies, consumer choice and power generation.

Mr. Wimmer is also responsible hybrid, plug-in electric and fuel cell vehicle external affairs and technical activities within Product Regulatory Affairs. He coordinates these with other Toyota divisions in the US and abroad. Additionally, he manages energy collaborations with other corporations, the company's interaction with the US Department of Energy and a portion of TMNA's university research activities.

Prior to joining Toyota, Mr. Wimmer was Technical Director of Fuel Cell Bus Programs at Georgetown University for twelve years where he provided technical and program management oversight during the design, fabrication and testing of five fuel cell / battery hybrid transit buses.

A native of California, Mr. Wimmer has an MS degree in Systems Management from the University of Southern California and a Mechanical Engineering degree from California State Polytechnic University in San Luis Obispo, CA.

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Xioalin Zheng

Xiaolin Zheng
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering
Stanford University

Professor Zheng received her Ph.D. in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University (2006), B.S. in Thermal Engineering from Tsinghua University (2000). Prior to joining Stanford in 2007, Professor Zheng did her postdoctoral work in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard University. Professor Zheng is a member of MRS, ACS and combustion institute. Professor Zheng received the TR35 Award from the MIT Technology Review (2013), one of the 100 Leading Global Thinkers by the Foreign Policy Magazine (2013), 3M Nontenured Faculty Grant Award (2013), the Presidential Early Career Award (PECASE) from the white house (2009), Young Investigator Awards from the ONR (2008), DARPA (2008), Terman Fellowship from Stanford (2007), and Bernard Lewis Fellowship from the Combustion Institute (2004).

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