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2010 Distinguished Lecturers printer friendly format
Nick Melosh


Nick Melosh
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Stanford University

Presentation Title: Improved Solar Conversion via Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (3.04 Mb)


Abstract:  Solar conversion is usually divided into two classes: quantum-based conversion, such as photovoltaics (PV), and thermal conversion, such as solar dishes and power towers. Because of the physics of PV, they cannot operate at high temperatures which would enable combined PV-thermal cycles with high efficiency. Professor Nick Melosh will describe a new physical mechanism that combines both photon and thermal contributions to the output voltage and can operate at high temperatures (200-1000ºC). This new mechanism, called photon-enhanced thermionic emission (PETE), has higher estimated efficiencies than PV cells, and when operated in tandem with realistic thermal systems could exceed 50% conversion efficiency. This technology could revolutionize solar conversion by providing an inexpensive adaptation to existing solar thermal designs that increases overall yield dramatically.

GCEP: Professor Melosh is currently a principal investigator for the GCEP effort “Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) for Solar Concentrator Systems.” He and his research group members are modeling, testing, and analyzing different materials and coating for the PETE process with the goal of creating an efficient solar conversion device that can operate at temperatures greater than 300ºC.

GCEP fact sheet :

Biography: Professor Melosh received his B.S. degree in Chemistry from Harvey Mudd College in 1996, then went on to do a Ph.D. in Materials Science at UC Santa Barbara working with Brad Chmelka, Galen Stucky, and Glenn Fredrickson. He then went to UCLA/Caltech to work with Professor Jim Heath as a post-doc from 2001-2003, and became an Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford University in 2003. Professor Melosh's interests include molecular electronics, electron emission, energy conversion, and interfacing electronics with biology. He is a Terman Fellow and Reid and Polly Anderson Faculty Scholar at Stanford University.


Paul McIntyre

Paul McIntyre
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Stanford University

Presentation Title: Atomic Layer Deposition of Oxides for Clean Energy Technologies: Solid State Electrolytes, Anodes for Water Splitting

Abstract: Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a versatile method for synthesizing pinhole-free ultra-thin films over almost arbitrarily rough and complex surfaces at low temperatures. It is particularly well-suited for deposition of metal oxides, many of which have interesting potential applications in energy technologies. In this presentation, Professor Paul McIntyre will review his group’s recent research on two topics: 1) ALD synthesis of nanostructured oxide layers for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells membranes; and 2) ALD-grown, oxidation resistant metal oxide coatings for anodes used in photo-electrochemical oxidation of water. Prospects for engineering metal oxide coatings with desired redox behavior and catalytic properties using ALD will be highlighted.

GCEP: Professor McIntyre is currently a principal investigator for the GCEP effort “Metal Oxide Nanotubes and Photo-Excitation Effects: New Approaches for Low-to-Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells” and the GCEP exploratory effort “Multijunction Nanowire Solar Cells for Inexpensive and Highly Efficient Photoelectricity: Enabling Methods.”

GCEP fact sheets:

Biography: Paul McIntyre is Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Director of the Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, and Senior Fellow of the Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford University. He is also co-director of the Initiative in Nanoscale Materials and Processes at Stanford. McIntyre leads a research team of approximately fifteen graduate students, post-doctoral researchers, visiting scientists, and consulting professors who perform basic research on nanostructured inorganic materials for applications in electronics, energy technologies and sensors. He is best known for his work on metal oxide/semiconductor interfaces, ultrathin high-k dielectrics, atomic layer deposition, complex metal oxide thin films, and nanostructured Si-Ge single crystals. His research team synthesizes materials, characterizes their structures and compositions with a variety of advanced microscopies and spectroscopies, studies the passivation of their interfaces, and measures functional properties of devices. In addition to GCEP, their research is supported by several U.S. government agencies and major semiconductor manufacturers world-wide. McIntyre is an author of over 140 archival journal papers and inventor of seven U.S. patents, and has given over 90 invited presentations, plenary talks, and tutorial lectures. He has received two IBM Faculty Awards and a Charles Lee Powell Foundation Faculty Scholarship in recognition of his group’s research.


Zhenan Bao



Zhenan Bao
Department of Chemical Engineering
Stanford University

Presentation Title: Carbon Nanomaterial-Based Transparent Electrodes

Abstract: Transparent electrodes (TEs) are vital components in solar cells, flat panel displays, and touch screens, wherein materials with high electrical conductivity and low optical absorption are required. Indium tin oxide (ITO) is the most commonly used TE material with sheet resistances (Rs) of roughly 40 Ω/sq at 90% transparency (at 550 nm), despite drawbacks including price, scarcity of indium, and brittleness. Next-generation electronic devices require flexible TEs composed of inexpensive, abundant materials. Several TE alternatives have been studied including: metal nanostructures, zinc oxide nanowires, and graphene films. However, limitations with processing, material quality, performance, and film roughness still remain.
Professor Zhenan Bao and her research group members have developed solution deposition methods to prepare partially aligned carbon nanotube networks. With their new doping method and morphology control, they are able to achieve performance comparable to that of ITO. This type of material is promising for thin film solar cell devices.


GCEP: Professor Bao is currently a principal investigator for the GCEP effort “Self-sorting of Metallic Carbon Nanotubes for High Performance Large Area Low Cost Transparent Electrodes.” She was also a principal investigator for GCEP effort “Advanced Materials and Devices for Low-Cost and High-Performance Organic Photovoltaic Cells,” which was completed in August 2009.

GCEP fact sheets:

Biography: Zhenan Bao is an Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering at Stanford University. She joined Stanford in 2004 after spending eight years as a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff in Bell Labs. Her research group focuses on the design, synthesis, processing, self-assembly, and device applications of organic, polymeric, and carbon nanomaterials for large area flexible electronics, transistors, chemical and biological sensors, pressure sensors, solar cells, and transparent electrodes. She has more than 200 refereed publications and 35 U.S. patents.

Professor Bao currently serves as a Board Member for the National Academy Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. She served as a member of Executive Board of Directors for the Materials Research Society and Executive Committee Member for the Polymer Materials Science and Engineering division of the American Chemical Society. She is an Associate Editor of Synthetic Metals. She was an Editor for Polymer Reviews and serves on the international advisory board for Advanced Functional Materials, Chemistry of Materials and Materials Today.

Professor Bao was elected a SPIE Fellow in 2008. She is a recipient of the Royal Society of Chemistry Beilby Medal and Prize in 2009, IUPAC Creativity in Applied Polymer Science Prize in 2008, American Chemical Society Team Innovation Award 2001, R&D 100 Award, and R&D Magazine’s Editors Choice of the “Best of the Best” new technology for 2001. She was selected in 2002 by the American Chemical Society Women Chemists Committee as one of the twelve “Outstanding Young Woman Scientist who is expected to make a substantial impact in chemistry during this century”. She was also selected by MIT Technology Review magazine in 2003 as one of the top 100 young innovators for this century. She is a Terman Fellow, Robert Noyce Faculty Scholar, Finmeccanica Faculty Scholar, and David Filo and Jerry Yang Faculty Scholar at Stanford University.

 
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