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Speaker Bios


Zhenan Bao

Zhenan Bao
Chemical Engineering
Stanford University

Bao is a professor of chemical engineering at Stanford University, and by courtesy, a professor of chemistry and a professor of materials science and engineering. Prior to joining Stanford in 2004, she was a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff in Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies from 1995-2004. She has over 350 refereed publications and more than 50 U.S. patents.

She is currently a principal investigator on the GCEP effort entitled, High-Energy-Density Lithium Ion Battery using Self-Healing Polymers.

Bao served as a board member for the National Academy Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology and Board of Directors for the Materials Research Society (MRS). She is an associate editor for Chemical Sciences.

She was the recipient of the AICHE Andreas Acroivos Award for Professional Progress in Chemical Engineering 2014, ACS Polymer Division Carl S. Marvel Creative Polymer Chemistry Award 2013, ACS Author Cope Scholar Award 2011, and Royal Society of Chemistry Beilby Medal and Prize 2009.

She was selected by MIT Technology Review magazine in 2003 as one of the top 100 young innovators. She is among the world's top 100 materials scientists by Thomson Reuters. She is a co-founder and on the Board of Directors for C3 Nano, a silicon-valley venture funded start-up commercializing flexible transparent electrodes.

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Charlie Barnhart

Charlie Barnhart
Environmental Sciences
Western Washington University

Barnhart is an assistant professor of Environmental Sciences at Western Washington University's Huxley College of the Environment. As a faculty member of Western's Institute for Energy Studies, he conducts energy systems analysis research and teaches energy courses. In particular, he quantifies material and energy resource use by renewable electricity generation and energy storage systems. His efforts focus on identifying technology attributes and characteristics that reduce energy and material use, lower carbon emissions and maintain economic viability. Prior to his current position, Barnhart was a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University's Global Climate and Energy Project, where he conducted a series of net energy analyses. He holds a Ph.D.in planetary geophysics from the University of California, Santa Cruz (2010), a B.S. in physics and a B.S. in astronomy from the University of Washington (2004).

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Sally Benson Photo

Sally Benson
Director of GCEP
Director of Precourt Institute for Energy
Stanford University

Benson joined Stanford University in 2007 and is the director of GCEP and a professor of energy resources engineering. In 2014, she received a second appointment as director of the Precourt Institute for Energy, the hub of energy research and education at Stanford. An internationally recognized scientist with extensive management experience, Benson is responsible for fostering cross-campus collaborations on energy and guiding the growth and development of as diverse research portfolio.

Prior to coming to Stanford, Benson was at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a leading research center supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and managed by the University of California. She held a variety of key positions during her 29-year tenure at Lawrence Berkeley, including deputy director of operations for the lab, director of the Earth Sciences Division and associate laboratory director for Energy Sciences.

A groundwater hydrologist and reservoir engineer, Benson is widely regarded as a leading authority on carbon capture and storage and emerging energy technologies. In 2012, she served as a convening lead author of the Global Energy Assessment (GEA), a multinational project coordinated by the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.

Benson's research interests include technologies and energy systems for a low-carbon future, and energy systems analysis. At Stanford, she leads a research laboratory that studies fundamental aspects of geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in saline aquifers. In 2005, Benson served as a coordinating lead author of a special report on CO2 capture and storage published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). In 2007, she was one of thousands of IPCC scientists to receive the Nobel Peace Prize "for their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change, and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change."

The author of more than 160 scientific publications, Benson is the co-founding editor of the journal, MRS Energy and Sustainability. Since 2006, she has delivered more than 200 invited talks on topics ranging from energy policy to carbon sequestration. She has also testified at U.S. Congressional hearings on climate change technology and CO2 sequestration.

Benson received a B.S. in geology from Barnard College at Columbia University, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in materials science and mineral engineering from the University of California-Berkeley.
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Robert Braun

Robert Braun
Mechanical Engineering
Colorado School of Mines

Braun is an associate professor of mechanical engineering at the Colorado School of Mines and a principal investigator on the GCEP program entitled, A Novel Solid Oxide Flow Battery. He received a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 2002. From 2002-2007, he was at United Technologies Fuel Cell and Research Center divisions where he last served as project leader for UTC’s mobile solid oxide fuel cell power system development program. His 10 years of industrial R&D experience encompasses development of low-NOx burners, CO2-based refrigeration, refrigerant charge diagnostics and fuel cell technologies for many applications. Braun has a multi-disciplinary background in mechanical and chemical engineering and his research focuses on energy systems modeling, analysis, techno-economic optimization and numerical simulation of transport phenomena occurring within alternative energy systems. His current research activities involve renewable energy pathways to synthetic fuel production and grid-scale energy storage, biorefinery systems modeling and analysis, and thermochemical energy storage systems for concentrating solar power plants. He has published 25 journal papers, three book chapters, is a Link Energy Foundation Fellow, a member of ASME, ACS, and ASHRAE, and holds four patents.

 

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Clint Chapple

Clint Chapple
Biochemistry
Purdue University

Chapple has been head of the Department of Biochemistry at Purdue University since 2008. He is a principal investigator on the GCEP program entitled, Lignin Management Optimizing Yield in Lignin Modified Plants.

Chapple has been acknowledged with a number of awards from Purdue University, including the Herbert Newby McCoy Award, University Faculty Scholar, the Agricultural Research Award and the Richard L. Kohls Award for Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching in the College of Agriculture. He now holds the rank of Distinguished Professor. In 2002, Chapple was named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has served on the editorial board of Annual Review of Plant Biology, and on many scientific advisory boards in the public and private sector.

His research focuses on phenylpropanoid metabolism, with major efforts in Arabidopsis and poplar. A major component of his research deals with lignin biosynthesis, the modification of which is of significant interest in the context of biofuel production.

Chapple received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. in botany and his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada and did his post-doctoral research with Chris Somerville at Michigan State University.
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William Chueh

William Chueh
Materials Science and Engineering
Stanford University

Chueh is an assistant professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and a Center Fellow of the Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford University. He is a principal investigator on the GCEP exploratory effort entitled, Gas Molecules as the Next-Generation Thermoelectric: Extracting Electricity from Hot Gas with No Moving Parts.

Chueh received his B.S. in applied physics, M.S. and Ph.D. (2010) in materials science from Caltech. Prior to joining Stanford in 2012, he was a Distinguished Truman Fellow at Sandia National Laboratories. Chueh has received numerous honors, including the Solid State Ionics Young Scientist Award (2013), Caltech Demetriades-Tsafka-Kokkalis Prize in Energy (2012), and the American Ceramics Society Diamond Award (2008). In 2012, he was named as one of the "top 35 innovators under the age of 35" by MIT's Technology Review.

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Yi Cui

Yi Cui
Materials Science and Engineering
Stanford University

Cui is an associate professor in materials science and engineering at Stanford University and has a joint appointment at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. His current research interests include nanomaterials for energy storage, photovotalics, topological insulators, biology and environment. He is a principal investigator on a number of GCEP efforts, including:

In 1998, Cui received a bachelor's degree in chemistry from the University of Science and Technology of China. He attended graduate school at Harvard University where his Ph.D. thesis focused on semiconductor nanowires for nanotechnology. He was a Miller Postdoctoral Fellow at University of California, Berkeley, working on electronics and assembly using colloidal nanocrystals.

Cui is an associate editor of Nano Letters. He is a co-director of the Bay Area Photovoltaics Consortium, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. He founded Amprius Inc., a company to commercialize the high-energy battery technology.
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Chris Edwards

Chris Edwards
Mechanical Engineering
Stanford University

Edwards is a professor in mechanical engineering and a senior fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford University. He currently is an investigator on two GCEP efforts: The Sootless Diesel and Carbon Capture Systems Analysis: Comparing Exergy Efficiency and Cost of Electricity of Existing and Future Technology Options.

His research group performs theoretical and experimental studies of energy transformations such that the conversion process can be made cleaner, more efficient and more controllable than has been possible with traditional technologies. Applications include advanced transportation engines (piston and turbine) and advanced electric power generation with carbon mitigation.
Edwards completed masters and Ph.D. degrees at the University of California - Berkeley, while investigating plasma jet ignition processes for ultra lean engine combustion. In 1985, he joined the technical staff at the Combustion Research Facility of Sandia National Laboratories, where he worked on experimental, theoretical, and diagnostic development components. In 1995, he was appointed a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff, the highest technical ranking at Sandia.

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Chris Field

Chris Field
Founding Director – Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology
Co-Chair – IPCC Working Group II

Field is the founding director of the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology. He also holds two faculty positions at Stanford University: the Melvin and Joan Lane Professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies, and professor of environmental Earth system science. He is co-chair of Working Group II of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which in 2012 led the effort on the IPCC Special Report, "Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation." The IPCC Fifth Assessment Report was released on March 31, 2014.

He is the GCEP Research Theme Leader in bioenergy and as a principal investigator led two GCEP programs: The Climate-Protective Domain and Technology Potential of Biofuels: Feasibility Assessment.

Field's research emphasizes impacts of climate change, from the molecular to the global scale. He has, for two decades, led major experiments on responses of California grassland to multifactor global change. He has been deeply involved with national- and international-scale efforts to advance science and assessment related to global ecology and climate change. 

He is a recipient of a Heinz Award and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Ecological Society of America.
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Thomas Friedman

Thomas Friedman
Columnist - The New York Times, Author

Friedman, a world-renowned author and journalist, has won the Pulitzer Prize three times for his work at The New York Times. His foreign affairs column, which appears twice a week, reports on U.S. domestic politics and foreign policy, Middle East conflicts, international economics, environment, biodiversity and energy.

Friedman is the author of From Beirut to Jerusalem, which won both the National Book and the Overseas Press Club Awards in 1989; a revised edition was released in December 2012. The Lexus and the Olive Tree, won the 2000 Overseas Press Club Award for best non-fiction book on foreign policy. Longitudes and Attitudes: Exploring the World After September 11, issued in 2002, consists of columns Friedman published about September 11. The World is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century, issued in April 2005 and updated in 2006 and 2007, received the inaugural Goldman Sachs/Financial Times Business Book of the Year Award. In 2008 he brought out Hot, Flat, and Crowded, which was published in a revised edition a year later. His sixth book, That Used to Be Us: How American Fell Behind in the World We Invented and How We Can Come Back, co-written with Michael Mandelbaum, was released in 2011.

For his coverage of the Middle East, Friedman was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1983 and 1988 for international reporting. He was awarded the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for Distinguished Commentary for "his clarity of vision...in commenting on the worldwide impact of the terrorist threat." In 2004, he was awarded the Overseas Press Club Award for lifetime achievement and the honorary title, Order of the British Empire (OBE), by Queen Elizabeth II.

Friedman lives in Bethesda, Maryland, with his wife, Ann.
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Turgut Gur

Turgut Gur
Materials Science and Engineering
Stanford University

Gur is a consulting professor of materials science and engineering at Stanford University and the executive director of Stanford’s DOE-EFRC Center on Nanostructuring for Efficient Energy Conversion. He served as the technical director for the NSF-MRSEC Center for Materials Research and as the founding technical director for Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials at Stanford. He is a principal investigator on the GCEP effort entitled, Co-generation of Carbon-Free Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal in a Steam-Carbon Fuel Cell with Carbon Capture.

For more than a decade, he served as an associate editor for the Journal of the American Ceramic Society and a board member and officer of the International Society for Solid State Ionics. He is an executive committee member and senior vice chair of the High Temperature Materials division, and a member of the ECS Transactions Editorial Advisory Board of The Electrochemical Society.

He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemical engineering from Middle East Technical University in Ankara/Turkey, and graduate degrees including a Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from Stanford University. He holds 10 U.S. patents and has authored or co-authored more than 150 technical articles related to various aspects of electrochemical energy conversion materials and processes.

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Chad Holliday

Chad Holliday
Member and Former Chairman of the Board
Bank of America

On October 30, 2014, Chad Holliday was appointed chairman of Royal Dutch Shell, where he served as a member of the board of directors.  At DuPont, he was the chairman of the board of directors and chief executive officer, positions he held for 11 years. Under his direction, DuPont established it mission to achieve sustainable growth: increasing shareholder and societal value while decreasing the company's environmental footprint. DuPont transitioned from a chemical company to a science company incorporating biotechnology with chemistry to solve complex problems in agriculture and materials science.

He serves as a member of the board of directors of Deere & Co., CH2MHILL and Bank of America, where he was board chair. He is chairman of the National Academy of Engineering, an honorary organization of over 2,000 of the most outstanding engineers in America. He is  chair of the Executive Committee of Sustainable Energy for All, a joint effort of the United Nations and The World Bank to provide more efficient and renewable energy to the world with a focus on the 1.3 billion people without energy access today. Holliday is managing director at East Meets West Solutions LLC (EMWS), a problem solving company. The unique approach of EMWS is utilizing the power of people that currently exists inside an organization.

Holliday is chairman emeritus of the board of the U.S. Council on Competitiveness, a nonpartisan, nongovernmental organization working to ensure U.S. prosperity. He chaired the National Academies study at the request of the U.S. Congress: "Research Universities and the Future of America: Ten Breakthrough Actions Vital to our Nation's Prosperity and Security." He is a founding member of the International Business Council. He also previously served as chairman of the following organizations: Catalyst, an organization supporting women's advancement in leadership positions; The Business Council; Society of Chemical Industry, American Section; and World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD).

Awards include:

  • Conservationist of the Year, National Wildlife Federation, 2013
  • Bridge Builders Award, Partners for Livable Communities, 2010
  • Nathan W. Dougherty Award, University of Tennessee, College of Engineering, 2009
  • George Washington Carver Award, Biotechnology Industry Organization, 2009
  • Distinguished Service Award, WBCSD, 2009
  • Medal for the Advancement of Research for Visionary Leadership, ASM International, 2004
  • International Leadership Award, U.S. Council for International Business, 2003
He received a bachelor's degree in industrial engineering from University of Tennessee and honorary doctorates from Polytechnic University in Brooklyn, New York.
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Roger T. Howe

Roger T. Howe
Electrical Engineering
Stanford University

Howe is the William E. Ayer Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received a B.S. degree in physics from Harvey Mudd College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 1981 and 1984. After faculty positions at Carnegie-Mellon University and MIT from 1984-1987, he returned to UC-Berkeley where he was a professor until 2005.

He is a principal investigator on the GCEP effort entitled, Using First-principles Simulations to Discover Materials with Ultra-low Work Functions for Energy Conversion Applications.

Howe's research interests include micro electromechanical system design, micro- and nano-machining technologies, and applications in energy conversion and biomolecular sensing. A focus of his research has been processes to fabricate integrated microsystems, which incorporate both silicon integrated circuits and MEMS. He has made contributions to the design of MEMS accelerometers, gyroscopes, electrostatic actuators, and microresonators.

Howe is an editor of the IEEE/ASME Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems. He was elected an IEEE Fellow in 1996, was co-recipient of the 1998 IEEE Cledo Brunetti Award, and was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Engineering in 2005 for his contributions to MEMS processes, devices, and systems.
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Thomas Jaramillo

Thomas Jaramillo
Chemical Engineering
Stanford University

Jaramillo is an associate professor in chemical engineering at Stanford University. He is the deputy director for experiments of the SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, a partnership between SLAC and Stanford’s Department of Chemical Engineering. Jaramillo is a GCEP research theme leader in the area of electrochemical energy conversion and storage and a principal investigator on the GCEP effort entitled, Designing Metal Catalysts for Electrochemical Conversion of CO2 and CO to Fuels and Chemicals.

Originally from San Juan, Puerto Rico, Jaramillo came to Stanford to pursue his B.S. degree in chemical engineering. He continued his education at the University of California- Santa Barbara, earning his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering. Jaramillo then conducted post-doctoral research at the Technical University of Denmark in the Department of Physics, as a Hans Christian Ørsted Post-doctoral Fellow. He returned to Stanford in Fall 2007 to start his independent research career.

In 2012, he was honored with the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers for his innovations in solar hydrogen production. His other awards include the National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award (2011), Mohr-Davidow Ventures MDV Innovator Award (2009), the Hellman Faculty Scholar Award (2009), and the NSF BRIGE Award.

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Dan Kammen

Daniel Kammen
Director of Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory
Professor in the Energy and Resources Group
University of California-Berkeley

Kammen is the Class of 1935 Distinguished Professor of Energy at the University of California-Berkeley, with parallel appointments in the Energy and Resources Group, the Goldman School of Public Policy, and the Department of Nuclear Engineering. He was appointed the first Environment and Climate Partnership for the Americas Fellow by Secretary of State Hillary R. Clinton in April 2010.

Kammen is the founding director of the Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory, co-director of the Berkeley Institute of the Environment and director of the Transportation Sustainability Research Center. He has founded or is on the board of over 10 companies and has served the State of California and U.S. federal government in expert and advisory capacities.

He was educated in physics at Cornell and Harvard and held postdoctoral positions at the California Institute of Technology and Harvard. He was assistant professor and chair of the Science, Technology and Environmental Policy Program at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University before moving to the University of California, Berkeley. He has served as a contributing or coordinating lead author on various reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change since 1999. The IPCC shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He serves on the Advisory Committee for Energy & Environment for the X-Prize Foundation.

During 2010-2011 Kammen served as the World Bank Group's Chief Technical Specialist for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency. He was appointed to this newly-created position in October 2010, and provided strategic leadership on policy, technical and operational fronts. The aim was to enhance the operational impact of the Bank's renewable energy and energy efficiency activities while expanding the institution's role as an enabler of global dialogue on moving energy development to a cleaner and more sustainable pathway.

He has authored or co-authored 12 books, written more than 300 peer-reviewed journal publications, testified more than 40 times to U.S. state and federal congressional briefings and has provided various governments with more than 50 technical reports. Kammen also served for many years on the Technical Review Board of the Global Environment Facility. He is a frequent contributor to or commentator in international news media, including Newsweek, Time, The New York Times, The Guardian and The Financial Times. He has appeared on 60 Minutes, Nova, Frontline, and hosted the six-part Discovery Channel series Ecopolis.
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Matthew Kanan

Matthew Kanan
Chemistry
Stanford University

Kanan joined the faculty in the Department of Chemistry at Stanford University as an assistant professor in 2009. His research addresses challenges in catalysis that span both solid-state and molecular systems. His energy research is focused on developing catalysts that will enable "CO2 recycling"—the use of renewable energy to convert CO2 back into liquid fuels and commodity chemicals. To this end, his group has developed a new class of heterogeneous catalysts that convert CO2 into higher alcohols and carboxylic acids using electrical power inputs. Kanan is the principal investigator on a GCEP effort in this area and entitled, "Nanostructured CU Electrodes for Energy-Efficient Conversion of CO2 to Fuel." His group has also pioneered the use of electrostatic interactions to control the selectivity of synthetic catalysts for fine chemical synthesis. Prior to Stanford, Kanan was an NIH Postdoctoral Researcher in inorganic chemistry at MIT and did his Ph.D. research in organic chemistry at Harvard.

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Hermamala Karunadasa

Hemamala Karunadasa
Chemistry
Stanford University

Karunadasa joined Stanford’s Department of Chemistry as an assistant professor in 2012. Her research interests span inorganic chemistry and materials science. Her group designs hybrid materials that combine the strengths of molecules and extended solids. The group members target materials for applications in renewable energy and pollution management: sorbents for capture and conversion of environmental pollutants, phosphors for solid-state lighting, electrodes for secondary batteries, and absorbers for solar cells. Along with Michael McGehee, she is a principal investigator on the GCEP-funded project “Novel inorganic-organic perovskites for solution processable photovoltaics.” Karunadasa is a Gabilan Junior Faculty Fellow, fellow of the Precourt Institute for Energy, and recipient of the NSF CAREER award (2014). She received her Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from UC-Berkeley in 2009 and her A. B. from Princeton University in 2003. She was a postdoctoral researcher at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the California Institute of Technology.

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Christina Li

Christina Li
Chemistry
Stanford University

Li is a Ph.D. candidate advised by Matthew Kanan in the Department of Chemistry at Stanford University. Her research focuses on the discovery and mechanistic study of catalysts for the electrochemical reduction of CO2 and CO to liquid fuels. In particular, Li works on a new class of materials called oxide-derived metals that provide a viable catalytic pathway for two-step conversion of CO2 to ethanol. She is the recipient of a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and a Stanford Graduate Fellowship. She received a B.A. in chemical and physical biology from Harvard University, conducting research in organic synthesis under the direction of David Evans. 

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Edward Maginn

Edward Maginn
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
University of Notre Dame

Maginn received his B.S. in chemical engineering from Iowa State University and his Ph.D in chemical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He joined the faculty of the University of Notre Dame in 1995 and currently holds the Dorini Family Chair of Energy Studies. He also serves as Chair of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

Maginn is a principal investigator on the GCEP effort entitled, Novel Ionic Liquids for Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture.

His research interests focus on the development and application of advanced atomistic simulation techniques to understand and predict structure-property relationships of materials, with a special emphasis on applications related to energy and environmental topics.

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Arun Majumdar

Arun Majumdar
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Senior Fellow at Precourt Institute for Energy
Stanford University

Majumdar is the Jay Precourt Provostial Chair Professor at Stanford University, where he serves on the faculty of the Department of Mechanical Engineering and is a senior fellow of the Precourt Institute for Energy.  

Prior to joining Stanford, he was vice president for energy at Google, where he created several energy technology initiatives and advised the company on its broader energy strategy. He continues to be a consultant to Google on energy.

In October 2009, Majumdar was nominated by President Obama and confirmed by the senate to become the founding director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy, where he served until June 2012. Between March 2011 and June 2012, he also served as the acting under secretary of energy and a senior advisor to the secretary of energy.  

Prior to joining the Department of Energy, Majumdar was the Almy and Agnes Maynard Chair Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering at the University of California-Berkeley and the associate laboratory director for energy and environment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, His research career includes the science and engineering of nanoscale materials and devices, as well as large engineered systems.

Majumdar is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He received his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay in 1985 and his Ph.D. from the University of California-Berkeley in 1989.  

He currently serves on the U.S. Secretary of Energy's Advisory Board, the Council for the National Academy of Engineering and the Electric Power Research Institute, as well as the science board of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.  He is a member of the International Advisory Panel for Energy of the Singapore Ministry of Trade and Industry, and the U.S. delegation for the US-India Track II dialogue on climate change and energy.  
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Christopher McClellan

Christopher McClellan
Plant Sciences
University of Dundee

McClellan is a postdoctoral researcher in the laboratory of Claire Halpin in the Division of Plant Sciences at the University of Dundee in the United Kingdom. His work focuses on the improvement of plants for biofuel production. Specifically, he is conducting mutant screens to identify genes that could be altered to improve saccharification, the process of converting cellulose in the plant cell wall to fermentable glucose, and applying those alterations to crop plants.

McClellan received his B.S. in biochemistry and molecular biology from Pennsylvania State University in 2003. He received his Ph.D. in cell biology and molecular genetics from the University of Maryland in 2009, where he studied how plants sense the phytohormone ethylene.

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Mike McGehee

Mike McGehee
Materials Science and Engineering Department
Stanford University

McGehee is the GCEP Research Theme Leader in the area of solar photovoltaics and has been a GCEP faculty committee member since 2007. As a principal investigator, he has worked on a total of seven GCEP research efforts, including two currents ones, "Novel Inorganic-organic Perovskites for Solution Processable Photovoltaics" and "Advanced Electron Transport Materials for Application in Organic Photovoltaics."

At Stanford, McGehee is a professor in the Materials Science and Engineering Department, the director of the Center for Advanced Molecular Photovoltaics and a senior fellow of the Precourt Institute for Energy. His research interests are patterning materials at the nanometer length scale, semiconducting polymers and solar cells.

McGehee received his undergraduate degree in physics from Princeton University and his Ph.D. degree in materials science from the University of California - Santa Barbara, where he did research on polymer lasers in the lab of Nobel Laureate Alan Heeger. He won the 2007 Materials Research Society Outstanding Young Investigator Award and has been ranked by Reuters as the 11th most influential materials scientist in the world. He is a technical advisor to Next Energy, PLANT PV, Plextronics and Sinovia. His students have founded five startup companies, including four in the solar cell and one in the transparent electrode areas.

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Reginal Mitchell

Reginald Mitchell
Mechanical Engineering
Stanford University

Mitchell is a professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Stanford University and is the director of the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory, a teaching and research laboratory within the ME Department that focuses on topics in the thermosciences. He is a principal investigator on the GCEP effort: Co-generation of Carbon-Free Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal in a Steam-Carbon Fuel Cell with Carbon Capture.

He has extensive knowledge of combustion science, with particular expertise in coal and biomass combustion and gasification phenomena. His experimental and modeling activities have been devoted to characterizing coal and biomass char conversion rates and developing reaction mechanisms that describe char reactivities to oxygen, steam and carbon dioxide. His current research is focused on topics that will enable the development of coal and biomass conversion technologies that facilitate CO2 capture, and include investigations of oxygen carriers for chemical looping combustion applications with coal and biomass fuels.

Mitchell received his B.S.Ch.E. degree from the University of Denver, his M.S.Ch.E. degree from New Jersey Institute of Technology and his Sc.D (doctorate of science) degree in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Eric Pop

Eric Pop
Electrical Engineering
Stanford University

Pop is an associate professor of electrical engineering (EE) at Stanford. He was previously with the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), first as an assistant professor then as an associate professor of electrical & computer engineering (2007-13). His research interests lie at the intersection of nanoelectronics and nanoscale energy conversion systems. He received his Ph.D. in EE from Stanford (2005), the M.Eng./B.S. in EE and B.S. in Physics from MIT. He was a postdoc at Stanford and worked at Intel before joining UIUC. His honors include the Presidential Early Career (PECASE) Award, and Young Investigator Awards from the ONR, NSF, AFOSR and DARPA (2008-2010). He is an IEEE Senior member, a member of APS and MRS, and the technical program chair of the IEEE Device Research Conference (DRC). More information about the Pop Lab can be found online at http://poplab.stanford.edu.

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Patrick Riley

Patrick Riley
Aero, Thermal & Mechanical Systems
GE Global Research

Riley is an energy systems research engineer in the Aero, Thermal & Mechanical Systems organization at GE Global Research based in Niskayuna, NY.  Since joining GE Global Research in 2005, he has provided system level technical and value analysis of various energy technologies including wind turbines, industrial scale energy storage technologies, gas turbines and fuel cells. Specifically for the past seven years, he has been focused on conceptual analysis, systems engineering and techno-economic analysis for advanced wind technologies.  Prior to GE, he was a systems & performance engineer at UTC Fuel Cells. Riley received his B.S. (2000) and M.S. (2002) degrees in Chemical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.  He was awarded the Rensselaer Alumni Association Director's Award in 2009.  

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Edward Rubin

Edward Rubin
Engineering & Public Policy
Carnegie Mellon University

Rubin is the Alumni Chair Professor of Environmental Engineering and Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He holds joint appointments in the Departments of Engineering & Public Policy, and Mechanical Engineering, and was the founding director of the university's Center for Energy and Environmental Studies and the Environmental Institute. He has over 300 publications dealing with technical, economic and policy issues related to energy and the environment, with a focus on climate change mitigation options including carbon capture and storage (CCS).

Rubin is the lead principal investigator on the GCEP program entitled, System Analysis of Advanced Power Plant Carbon Capture Technologies.

His activities include roles as a coordinating lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage; advisor to the State of California and the Province of Alberta, Canada on policies for CCS; Board member of the UK CCS Research Centre; and an author of the recent National Academies study of "America's Climate Choices." Among his awards Rubin is a recipient of the AWMA Lyman A. Ripperton Award for distinguished achievements as an educator. He received his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the City College of New York and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University.

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Ian Smith

Ian Smith
Chemistry
Stanford University

Smith is a Ph.D. candidate in the Chemistry Department at Stanford University and is starting his third year working in Hemamala Karunadasa’s group. His research focuses on hybrid organic-inorganic semiconductor materials for energy applications, with a major emphasis on novel photovoltaic materials. He has demonstrated the first successful application of a layered hybrid perovskite in photovoltaic devices as part of a collaboration with Michael McGehee in Stanford's Materials Science and Engineering Department. In addition to working with layered perovskites, Smith continues to explore new materials and crystal structure types for their potential utilization in energy applications. ┬áHe grew up in Eugene, Oregon and holds a B.A. degree in chemistry and mathematics from Cornell University. At Cornell, he worked for Frank DiSalvo in the Chemistry Department developing techniques for fabricating new fuel cell catalyst supports.

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Pete Trelenberg

Pete Trelenberg
Manager – Environmental Policy & Planning
Exxon Mobil Corporation

Trelenberg received his B.S. degree in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Wisconsin in 1980 and joined ExxonMobil as a project engineer at the Bayway Chemical Plant in New Jersey. He has subsequently worked in a variety of project, planning and business development roles of increasing responsibility for ExxonMobil’s chemical businesses in the U.S. and Asia; was a senior adviser at the corporation’s headquarters in Dallas; refinery manager at Torrance in California; and most recently, head of planning and business development for ExxonMobil Chemical Company in Houston. He became Manager – Environmental Policy and Planning for ExxonMobil in December 2011. Trelenberg has been a licensed professional engineer in Wisconsin and New Jersey. He is married and has three children.

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Chao Wang

Chao Wang
Chemical Engineering
Stanford University

Wang is a postdoctoral scholar in chemical engineering at Stanford University. He obtained his Ph.D. in chemistry from Tsinghua University in 2011. His Ph.D. thesis, which focused on supramolecular chemistry, won the National Excellent Doctoral Dissertation Award of China (top 0.1% for overall excellence nationally). In 2011, Wang joined Zhenan Bao’s group at Stanford University as a postdoctoral scholar. He introduced self-healing chemistry, a concept derived from supramolecular chemistry, to the group and developed self-healing electronics and energy storage devices. Wang has published more than 20 peer-reviewed papers with an H-index of 16.

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Robert Waymouth

Robert Waymouth
Chemistry
Stanford University

Waymouth is a professor of Chemistry at Stanford University and a principal investigator on the GCEP program, Electrohydrogenation: Enabling Science for Renewable Fuels

He leads a research team of 12 students and two postdocs. Their research is directed towards the development of new catalytic strategies for polymer chemistry, biomass conversion and energy conversion.

His most recent work has focused on the development of organocatalytic strategies for polymer synthesis, the synthesis and study of cyclic macromolecules, the selective oxidation of biomass-derived polyols and electrocatalysis.   He received a National Science Foundation Waterman Award, the Walter J. Gores and Phi Beta Kappa Award for Excellence in Teaching.  With Jim Hedrick of IBM, he received the Cooperative Research Award in Polymer Science and Engineering and the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award.  Waymouth received his Ph.D. in Chemistry with Robert Grubbs at the California Institute of Technology and was a postdoctoral fellow with Piero Pino at the ETH in Zurich in 1987.

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John Woolard

John Woolard
Vice President - Energy
Google

Woolard is the vice president of energy at Google, where he is focused on the company’s global energy strategy through investment in new technology and creation of new business opportunities. From 2006 to 2013, he served as the president and chief executive officer of BrightSource Energy, where he led the development, construction and commissioning of the $2.2 billion, 392 MW Ivanpah solar thermal power plant.

In 1996, Woolard began his career in energy at Lawrence Berkeley Labs in the Energy and Environment Division, and then joined PG&E Energy Services to lead their efforts in Facility Information and Control Systems. He co-founded Silicon Energy in 1997 and served as the president, chief executive officer and chairman as he led its growth in enterprise energy management software through its acquisition by Itron in 2003. He then served as vice president and general manager of End User Solutions Business Unit and Energy Management Solutions Group at Itron through 2005.

He served on the board of the California Clean Energy Fund, the Tuolumne River Preservation Trust and the Strategic Advisory Board for Xcel Energy.  Woolard holds an M.B.A. from the Haas School of Business at the University of California - Berkeley, an M.A. in environmental planning from the University of Virginia and a B.A. in economics from the University of Virginia.

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